Author Archives: ADMIN

WATER – Facts YOU Need to Know About Primary Water . . .

WATER – Facts YOU Need to Know About Primary Water . . .
 
The practice of accessing primary water has been around for centuries. What early Greek philosophers like Aristotle and the Italian Leonardo DaVinci believed, and enlightened scientists working at well-known universities today are exploring, is that all water is created in the mantle of the earth and is available in limitless quantities, worldwide.
 
Drilling for primary water looks similar to drilling for ground water. The main difference in accessing primary water is that it requires drilling into a geologic fissure or fault to release the primary water that has risen near the surface.
 
Locating well sites for primary water requires special training and experience. There are countless primary water wells that have been functioning for decades all over California and around the world.
 
Primary water advantages:
• Provides excellent quality, clean, unspoiled water
• Is fresh and not subject to pollution or surface radiation
• Is created under pressure, so that it comes near the surface by itself, incurring less pumping costs
• Never dries up
• Unlike groundwater, is not subject to the effects of drought
• Does not cause subsidence like some groundwater wells
• Refills depleted groundwater supplies from below in some instances
• Is plentiful and replenishable
• Water can be localized to meet the water needs of individual communities
• Horizontal drilling rigs can benefit fish and wildlife by refilling dried up streams and lakes. Primary water was used to refill dried up lakes such as Lake Elsinore (which went dry in the 1950s).
• Primary water wells can now be used to supplement existing water transport systems like the California aqueduct
 
Some history of Primary Water
 
In the 1960’s, the late Dr. Stephen Riess, a geologist and mining engineer, introduced the California government to the concept of primary water. He proposed a water delivery plan which included drilling 8,000 primary water wells along the foothills of the western slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The State government at the time was geared toward managing only atmospheric water, so the Riess proposal was ignored and the California Aqueduct was built instead.
 
Had Riess’ plan been endorsed, the output of these primary water wells, at a conservative average of 270 gallons per minute, would be producing more than 3,100,000,000 gallons of water per day (8,000 x 270 x 60 x 24), 365 days a year.
 
If a scaled down version of Riess’s plan utilizing primary water wells was in place today, the problem of water outages in many of the central valley towns in California who have now run out, would never have happened. If the technology of drilling for primary water had not been repressed for decades by the California government (and other governments worldwide), plenty of fresh water would be flowing for farming, wildlife and people regardless of multi-year droughts.
 
Look for an illustration showing both the primary and atmospheric water cycles, a free E-Book entitled New Water for a Thirsty World, and technical scientific papers available on the Primary Water Institute’s website at www.primarywaterinstitute.org.
 
The mission of the Primary Water Institute is to train individuals to locate and drill for primary water in California and around the globe. Please support Pal Pauer and the Primary Water Institute if you can.

WATER SUPPLIES – Tracked Worldwide: Landsat’s Thermal Band Mapping – The World Bank Water Management (Rothschild) and many others

https://landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/soc_0011.pdf

Full paper in link above.

Precious Resources: Water and Landsat’s Thermal Band
“Chronic water supply problems in many areas of the West are among the
greatest challenges we face in the coming decades.” Mark Limbaugh, the U.S.
Department of the Interior’s (DOI) Assistant Secretary for Water and Science, told
U.S. Senators in 2006.1
He was largely echoing the findings of the DOI Water 2025 report. The report
explains that if future conflict over water in the West is to be avoided, water
efficiency needs to improve.2
Until then, conflict and environmental degradation
will be the costs of the increasing demands––dominated by agricultural irrigation
and swelling city populations––on limited water supplies.
Irrigation: a numerical explanation
Irrigation accounts for 80% of fresh water use in the U.S3
and worldwide, the
World Bank estimates 70% of fresh water use is for agriculture.4
The U.S. irrigates
over 50 million acres of agricultural land and 32 million acres of recreational
landscapes (lawns, golf courses, etc.).5
The total volume consumed by agriculture
and landscape irrigation is 50 trillion gallons per year;6
western states are
responsible for 86% of that consumption.7
A growing problem
The arid U.S. West is experiencing explosive population growth. The 2000
Census reported that one third of all Americans live in the West, and that the West
accounted for half of the overall U.S. population growth over that decade.8
Seven of the ten fastest growing U.S. cities are found in the West and
Albuquerque, El Paso, Las Vegas, and Tucson will not be able to supply enough
water for their burgeoning growth with present sources.9
Recent drought brought
about bitter legal battles for the precious water resources of the Rio Grande River
highlighting that the river’s waters are stretched thin between the city of
Albuquerque, farmers, endangered species, and local Native Americans

 

WATER LIES: A Guide for Private Domestic Well Owners . . . California State Water Resources “Control” Board . . .

WATER LIES:  A Guide for Private Domestic Well Owners . . . California State Water Resources “Control” Board . . .
 
NOTE:  
Keep in mind the water “control” boards will NOT tell you about Primary Water. 
The water “control” boards are denying us the truth about where water really originates.  The “control” boards tell us our water comes from rain and snow melt which is the “secondary” water cycle. We are NEVER told about the Primary Water Cycle.  ALL water comes from down below the mantel of the earths crust where hydrogen and oxygen merge creating vapor and is forced under pressure to the surface becoming the pure fresh water we are being denied.
We can NO longer depend upon water “control” boards, water “control” agencies, water “control” policies or any talking heads that are dishonest.
We are being told water is running out and we have severe water shortages.  This is NOT true.
Understand the water “control” agents are extremely dangerous and simply put without water massive numbers of people will die.  All the water scare tactics and forced rationing schemes will reduce the food supply and force relocations of population that become resource refugees.
Please go to www.PrimaryWater.org and share with everyone you know the REAL truth about the abundance of pure clean Primary Water. .
 
The guide you will read below demonstrates the disinformation we are being told.  Here is an example of the GREAT WATER LIE you will read in their intentional disinformation guide:

“Most groundwater comes from rain and snow that falls to the ground and percolates downward through the soil, until it accumulates above a confining layer (see Figure 1), or aquitard (see Figure 4). The area in the ground that is filled with water is called the saturated zone, and the top of the saturated zone is called the water table”.  (What you just read is NOT the truth)

 
A Guide for Private Domestic Well Owners . . . California State Water Resources “Control” Board . . .


https://www.waterboards.ca.gov/gama/docs/wellowner_guide.pdf 

Water Restrictions & Conservation | Palm Beach Gardens, FL – Official Website – police department is assisting with oversight of residential compliance.

Water Restrictions & Conservation

Water is one of our most important natural resources. The City of Palm Beach Gardens needs your help in conserving water for the protection of our environment, particularly as we experience these serious drought conditions. The City’s Code Compliance Division and the Police Department have collaborated on water restrictions enforcement.  Code Compliance staff are monitoring commercial water usage and the police department is assisting with oversight of residential compliance.

For more information regarding water restrictions, view the [/DocumentCenter/View/682]Reclaimed Water Map (PDF) or go to South Florida Water Management District.

Residential / Commercial Restrictions
To report any water restriction violations, please contact the Palm Beach Gardens Police department at: 799-4445.

Contact Us

  1. Code Compliance Division

    10500 N Military Trail
    Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410
    Directions

    561-799-4245
    (M-F; 8AM-5PM)
    Fax: 561-799-4254

WATER LAWS – Fines, Restrictions POLICED . . .Chapter 74 – UTILITIES | Code of Ordinances | Palm Beach Gardens, FL | Municode Library

WATER LAWS – Fines, Restrictions POLICED . . .Chapter 74 – UTILITIES | Code of Ordinances | Palm Beach Gardens, FL | Municode Library
Date: 

  

                     

                                                           

  • Chapter 74 – UTILITIES[1]
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
  • ARTICLE I. – IN GENERAL
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
  • Secs. 74-1—74-35. – Reserved.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
  • ARTICLE II. – WATER CONSERVATION
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
  • Sec. 74-36. – Definitions.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION

    The following words, terms and phrases, when used in this article, shall have the meanings ascribed to them in this section, except where the context clearly indicates a different meaning:

    Code enforcement office/code inspector means any authorized agent or employee of the city whose duty is to ensure compliance with the provisions of this article, including, but not limited to, designated employees of the police, building, code enforcement, and public works departments.

    Impervious means land surfaces which do not allow the penetration of water including paved roads, sidewalks, driveways, parking lots and highly compacted areas including shell and clay.

    Low-volume irrigation system (microirrigation) means that type of equipment or irrigation device designed to provide small quantities of water on or below the soil surface as drops or tiny streams of spray through emitters or applicators placed along a water delivery line. Microirrigation includes methods or concepts such as bubbler, drip, trickler, mist, or microspray, and subsurface irrigation.

    (Code 1987, § 51.05)

    Cross reference— Definitions generally, § 1-2.

  • Sec. 74-37. – Applicability.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION

    All provisions of this article shall be effective within the incorporated areas of the city, and shall set restrictions, constraints and prohibitions to enhance the city’s water resources and provide a permanent water conservation measure. Unless otherwise provided, nothing in this article shall be construed to relieve any person from compliance with any applicable regulations enacted by any agency of the state having jurisdiction over water resources in the city.

    (Code 1987, § 51.02)

  • Sec. 74-38. – Purpose.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION

    The purpose of this article is to establish a regulatory framework and guidance document which will help ensure that water and landscape irrigation conservation will be consistent throughout the city.

    (Code 1987, § 51.04)

  • Sec. 74-39. – Hours restricted.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION

    Irrigation of any residential, commercial, institutional, governmental or industrial landscape areas shall be restricted to the hours of 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 a.m.

    (Code 1987, § 51.20)

  • Sec. 74-40. – Waste prohibited.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION

    It shall be unlawful to operate or cause the operation of any irrigation system or device in a manner causing water to be wasted, including but not limited to unnecessary watering of impervious areas.

    (Code 1987, § 51.21)

  • Sec. 74-41. – Water sensing devices.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION

    Upon the effective date of the ordinance from which this article was derived new installations of automatic irrigation systems providing coverage of greater than one acre of irrigated area shall be equipped with a water sensing device which will automatically discontinue irrigation during periods of rainfall.

    (Code 1987, § 51.22)

  • Sec. 74-42. – Exemptions.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION

    The following activities shall be exempt from the provisions of this article:

    (1)

    Landscape irrigation by hand watering.                                   

    (2)

    Landscape irrigation by systems from which the sole source is treated wastewater effluent.                                  

    (3)

    The operation of irrigation systems for system repair and maintenance.                                   

    (4)

    Flushing of water mains required for normal water main clearance and maintenance and for maintenance of water quality; however, where practical, contractors and utilities shall direct flushed water into pervious areas, flush at the minimum rate necessary for cleaning and disperse the water in such a manner to benefit local vegetation.

    (5)

    Landscape irrigation for purposes of watering in fungicides, insecticides and herbicides as required by the manufacturer or by federal or state laws.

    (Code 1987, § 51.23)

  • Sec. 74-43. – Enforcement; penalty.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
    (a)

    Failure to comply with the requirements of this article shall constitute a violation of a city ordinance, and may be punished as provided by section 2-186 et seq. Each day in violation of this article shall constitute a separate offense. Violations of the provisions of this article may also be punished, pursuant to F.S. ch. 162 by a fine not to exceed $250.00 per day for a first violation, and $500.00 per day for a repeat violation.

    (b)

    In addition to the sanctions contained herein, the city may take appropriate action, including but not limited to administrative action and requests for temporary and permanent injunctions, to enforce the provisions of this article.

    (c)

    Violations of this article, punishable by civil fine pursuant to F.S. ch. 162 shall be referred to the code enforcement board.

    (d)

    All monies collected pursuant to this article shall be deposited in the general fund of the city.                            

    (Code 1987, § 51.99)

  • Secs. 74-44—74-60. – Reserved.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
  • ARTICLE III. – STORMWATER SYSTEM[2]
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
  • Sec. 74-61. – Definitions.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION

    The following words, terms and phrases, when used in this article, shall have the meanings ascribed to them in this section, except where the context clearly indicates a different meaning:

    Authorized official means any employee of the city authorized in writing by the director to administer or enforce the provisions of this article.

    Director means the director of public works.

    Discharge means any direct or indirect entry of any solid, liquid or gaseous matter.

    Site of industrial activity means any area or facility used for manufacturing, processing or raw materials storage, as defined under 40 CFR 122.26(a)(14) of regulations of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, as amended.

    Stormwater means any stormwater runoff, and surface runoff and drainage.

    Stormwater system means the system of conveyances used for collecting, storing, and transporting stormwater owned by the city but not including any facilities intended to be used in accordance with applicable law for collecting and transporting sanitary or other wastewater.

    (Code 1987, § 102.01)

    Cross reference— Definitions generally, § 1-2.

  • Sec. 74-62. – Enforcement.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
    (a)

    Injunctive relief. Any violation of any provision of this article, or of any regulation or order issued hereunder, shall be subject to injunctive relief if necessary to protect the public health, safety or general welfare.

    (b)

    Continuing violation. A person shall be deemed guilty of a separate violation for each and every day during any continuing violation of any provision of this article or of any regulation or permit issued hereunder.

    (c)

    Enforcement actions. The director may take all actions necessary, including the issuance of notices of violation and the filing of court actions and/or referral of this matter to the code enforcement board to require and enforce compliance with the provisions of this article and with any regulation or permit issued hereunder.

    (Code 1987, § 102.05)

  • Sec. 74-63. – Inspections and monitoring.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION

    Whenever necessary to make an inspection to enforce any of the provisions of this article, or regulation or permit issued hereunder, or whenever an authorized official has reasonable cause to believe there exists any condition constituting a violation of any of the provisions of this article, or regulation or permit issued hereunder, any authorized official may enter any property, building or facility at any reasonable time to inspect the same or to perform any duty related to (including but not limited to a site of industrial activity) to undertake such reasonable monitoring of any discharges to the stormwater system and to furnish periodic reports.

    (Code 1987, § 102.06)

  • Sec. 74-64. – Industrial activity.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
    (a)

    General provisions. Any discharge into the stormwater system in violation of any federal, state, county, municipal or other law, rule, regulation or permit is prohibited.

    (b)

    Specific prohibitions. By adoption of industrial activity stormwater regulations or by issuance of industrial activity stormwater permits, or both, the director may impose reasonable limitations as to the quality of stormwater (including without limitation the designation of maximum levels of pollutants) discharged into the stormwater system from sites of industrial activity. Any promulgation of such regulations and issuance of permits by the director shall be in accordance with applicable law.

    (c)

    Administrative order. The director may issue an order to any person to immediately cease any discharge determined by the director to be in violation of any provision of this article, or in violation of any regulation or permit issued hereunder.

    (d)

    NPDES permits. Any person who holds a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit shall provide a copy of such permit to the director no later than the latter of: 60 calendar days after the effective date of the ordinance from which this article was derived or 60 calendar days after issuance.

    (Code 1987, § 102.02)

  • Sec. 74-65. – Illicit discharges.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
    (a)

    General prohibitions. Except as set forth in subsection (c) of this section or as in accordance with a valid NPDES permit, any discharge to the stormwater system that is not composed entirely of stormwater is prohibited.

    (b)

    Specific prohibitions. Any discharge to the stormwater system containing any sewage, industrial waste or other waste materials, or containing any materials in violation of federal, state, county, municipal, or other laws, rules, regulations, orders or permits, is prohibited.

    (c)

    Authorized exceptions. Unless the director determines that it is not properly managed or otherwise is not acceptable, the following discharges are exempt from the general prohibition set forth in subsection (a) of this section: flows from firefighting, water line flushing and other contributions from potable water sources, landscape irrigation and lawn watering, irrigation water, diverted stream flows, rising groundwaters, direct infiltration to the stormwater system, uncontaminated pumped groundwater, foundation and footing drains, water from crawl space pumps, air conditioning condensation, springs, individual residential car washings, flows from riparian habitats and wetlands, and dechlorinated swimming pool contributions.

    (d)

    Illicit connections. No person may maintain, use or establish any direct or indirect connection to the stormwater system that results in any discharge in violation of this article. This prohibition is retroactive and applies to connections made in the past, regardless of whether made under a permit, or other authorization, or whether permissible under laws or practices applicable or prevailing at the time the connection was made.

    (e)

    Administrative order. The director may issue an order to any person to immediately cease any discharge, or any connection to the stormwater system, determined by the director to be in violation of any provision of this article, or in violation of any regulation or permit issued hereunder.

    (Code 1987, § 102.03)

  • Sec. 74-66. – Spills and dumping.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
    (a)

    General prohibitions. Except as set forth in section 74-65, or as in accordance with a valid NPDES permit, any discharge to the stormwater system that is not composed entirely of stormwater is prohibited.

    (b)

    Specific prohibitions. Any discharge to the stormwater system containing any sewage, industrial waste or other waste materials, or containing any materials in violation of federal, state, county, municipal, or other laws, rules, regulations, orders or permits, is prohibited.

    (c)

    Notification of spills. As soon as any person has knowledge of any discharge to the stormwater system in violation of this article, such person shall immediately notify the director by telephone or other direct means and if such person is directly or indirectly responsible for such discharge, then such person shall also take immediate action to ensure the containment and cleanup of such discharge and shall confirm such telephone notification in writing to the director within three calendar days.

    (d)

    Administrative order. The director may issue an order to any person to immediately cease any discharge, or connection to the stormwater system, determined by the director to be in violation of any provision of this article, or in violation of any regulation or permit issued hereunder.

    (Code 1987, § 102.04)

  • Secs. 74-67—74-70. – Reserved.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
  • ARTICLE IV. – WATER SHORTAGE REGULATIONS
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
  • Sec. 74-71. – Intent and purpose.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION

    The intent and purpose of this article is to protect the water resources of the City of Palm Beach Gardens from the harmful effects of over utilization during periods of water shortage and allocate available water supplies by assisting the South Florida Water Management District in the implementation of its water shortage plan.

    (Ord. No. 02-2001, § 2, 3-15-01)

  • Sec. 74-72. – Definitions.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION

    The following terms, phrases, words and their derivatives, when used in this article, shall have the meanings ascribed to them in this section. When not inconsistent with the context, words used in the present tense include the future, words in the plural include the singular, and words in the singular include the plural. The word “shall” is always mandatory and not merely directory.

    “District” means the South Florida Water Management District.

    “Person” means any person, firm, partnership, association, corporation, company, or organization of any kind.

    “Water resource” means any and all water on or beneath the surface of the ground, including natural or artificial watercourses, lakes, ponds, or diffused surface water, and water percolating, standing, or flowing beneath the surface of the ground.

    “Water shortage condition” means when sufficient water is not available to meet present or anticipated needs of persons using the water resource, or when conditions are such as to require temporary reduction in total water usage within a particular area to protect the water resource from serious harm.

    “Water shortage emergency” means that situation when the powers which can be exercised under Part II of Chapter 40E-21, Florida Administrative Code, are not sufficient to protect the public health, safety or welfare, or the health of animals, fish or aquatic life, or a public water supply, or commercial, industrial, agricultural, recreational or other reasonable uses.

    (Ord. No. 02-2001, § 2, 3-15-01)

  • Sec. 74-73. – Application of article.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
    (a)

    The provisions of this article shall apply to all persons using the water resource within the geographical areas subject to the “water shortage” or “water shortage emergency,” as determined by the district, whether from public or privately owned water utility systems, private wells, or private connections with surface water bodies.

    (b)

    The article shall not apply to persons using treated effluent or saltwater.                             

    (Ord. No. 02-2001, § 2, 3-15-01)

  • Sec. 74-74. – Amendments to water shortage plan.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION

    Chapter 40E-21, Florida Administrative Code, as it may be amended from time to time, is incorporated herein by reference as a part of the Codes of the City of Palm Beach Gardens.

    (Ord. No. 02-2001, § 2, 3-15-01)

  • Sec. 74-75. – Declaration of water shortage; water shortage emergency.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION

    The declaration of a water shortage or water shortage emergency within all or part of the City of Palm Beach Gardens by the governing board or executive director of the district shall invoke the provisions of this article. Upon such declaration all water use restrictions or other measures adopted by the district applicable to the City of Palm Beach Gardens, or any portion thereof, shall be subject to enforcement action pursuant to this article. Any violation of the provisions of Chapter 40E-21, Florida Administrative Code, or other any order issued pursuant thereto, shall be a violation of this article.

    (Ord. No. 02-2001, § 2, 3-15-01)

  • Sec. 74-76. – Enforcement.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION

    Every law enforcement officer, code enforcement officer, or sheriff having jurisdiction in the area governed by this article shall, in connection with all other duties imposed by law, diligently enforce the provisions of this article.

    (Ord. No. 02-2001, § 2, 3-15-01)

  • Sec. 74-77. – Enforcement; penalties.
    SHARE LINK TO SECTIONPRINT SECTIONDOWNLOAD (DOCX) OF SECTIONSEMAIL SECTION
    (a)

    Failure to comply with the requirements of this article shall be subject to the following penalties:                            

    First violation $25.00
    Second violation $250.00
    Third and subsequent violations Fine not to exceed $500.00 and/or imprisonment in the county jail not to exceed 60 days.

    Each day in violation of this article shall constitute a separate offense. In the initial stages of a water shortage or water shortage emergency, law enforcement officials may provide violators with no more than one written warning. The City of Palm Beach Gardens, in addition to the criminal sanctions contained herein, may take any other appropriate legal action, including, but not limited to emergency injunctive action, to enforce the provisions of this article. All monies collected pursuant to this article shall be deposited in the general fund of the City of Palm Beach Gardens.

    (Ord. No. 02-2001, § 2, 3-15-01)

    RESIDENTIAL/COMMUNITY Water-Use Restrictions

    PHASE I MODERATE PHASE II SEVERE PHASE III EXTREME PHASE IV CRITICAL
    LANDSCAPE WATERING
    Lots Under 5 Acres
    •Odd Number Addresses 3 days 2 days 1 day 1 day
    Monday, Wednesday, Saturday Wednesday, Saturday Saturday Saturday
    Irrigation: 4—8 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m. Irrigation: 4—8 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m. Irrigation: 4—7 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m. Irrigation: 6—7 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m.
    •Even Number Addresses 3 days 2 days 1 day 1 day
    Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday Thursday, Sunday Sunday Sunday
    Irrigation: 4—8 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m. Irrigation: 4—8 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m. Irrigation: 4—7 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m. Irrigation: 6—7 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m.
    Lots Over 5 Acres
    •Odd Number Addresses 3 days 2 days 1 day 1 day
    Monday, Wednesday, Saturday Wednesday, Saturday Saturday Saturday
    Irrigation: 12:01—8 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m. Irrigation: 12:01—8 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m. Irrigation: 12:01—7 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m. Irrigation: 4—7 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m.
    •Even Number Addresses 3 days 2 days 1 day 1 day
    Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday Thursday, Sunday Sunday Sunday
    Irrigation: 12:01—8 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m. Irrigation: 12-01—8 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m. Irrigation: 12:01—7 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m. Irrigation: 4—7 a.m. and Hand Watering: 5—7 p.m.
    NEW LANDSCAPING (in place less than 30 days)
    Lots Under 5 Acres 5 days 4 days 3 days 1 day
    Monday through Friday                                                                Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday Monday, Wednesday, Friday Saturday
    Irrigation: 2—8 a.m. Irrigation: 2—8 a.m. Irrigation: 2—7 a.m. Irrigation: 6—7 a.m.
    Lots Over 5 Acres 5 days 4 days 3 days 1 day
    Monday through Friday                                                                Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday Monday, Wednesday, Friday Saturday
    Irrigation: 12:01—8 a.m. Irrigation: 12:01—8 a.m. Irrigation: 12:01—7 a.m. Irrigation: 4—7 a.m.
    All Lots Low volume hand watering/irrigation allowed anytime. 3 days
    Monday, Wednesday, Friday Low volume hand watering/irrigation
    IRRIGATION SYSTEMS (deaning, adjusting, repairing)
    Existing Systems 10 minutes per zone per week. Cleaning and adjusting prohibited.
    New Systems 10 minutes per zone on a one-time basis. Cleaning and adjusting prohibited.
    PESTICIDE APPLICATION
    All lots Application is allowed on the same schedule as landscape watering (with voluntary reduction). If applied outside of the allowed hours, a licensed pesticide technician must be on the premises.
    OTHER
    Car/Boat Washing Allowed 4—8 a.m. according to landscape watering days. Allowed 4—7 a.m. according to landscape watering day. Allowed 6—7 a.m. according to landscape watering day.
    Washing allowed 5—7 p.m. on landscape watering days. Use automatic shut-off nozzle and drain to porous surface.
    Boat Rinsing After Salt Water Use Allowed once a day, up to 15 minutes per boat.
    Boat Washing As Primary Residence Allowed on landscape watering days, based on odd or even slip number.
    Swimming Pool Filling/Refilling Filling or refilling allowed. Must drain to porous surface. Filling of new pool allowed. Refill only if leaking more than one inch per day. Filling or refilling of new or existing pool prohibited.
    Ornamental (aesthetic) Water Uses Operating recirculating water features allowed. Outside/Inside uses prohibited.
    Washing Non-Porous Surface (sidewalks, etc.)                                                                Washing/rinsing with a hose NOT allowed. Low volume pressure cleaning only
    Outside Pressure Cleaning (Low Volume) 7 days Voluntary Reduction 5 days Voluntary Reduction Monday through Friday 2 days Voluntary Reduction Monday, Wednesday

    COMMERCIAL/RECREATION Water-Use Restrictions

    PHASE I MODERATE PHASE II SEVERE PHASE III EXTREME PHASE IV CRITICAL
    IRRIGATION SYSTEMS (deaning, adjusting, repairing)*
    Less Than One Acre Permitted 10 minutes per zone per week.
    One or More Than One Acre Permitted one hour per acre per week.
    PESTICIDE APPLICATION
    Licensed Individual/Company Application is permitted anytime with voluntary reduction.
    MOBILE EQUIPMENT WASHING
    Commercial Establishment Permitted anytime, Limited to 75 gallons or less per vehicle for cars, vans, and small trucks (under 10,000 lbs). Large trucks (over 10,000 lbs.) limited to 150 gallons or less. Permitted 8:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. Limited to 75 gallons or less per vehicle for cars, vans, and small trucks (under 10,000 lbs.). Large trucks (over 10,000 lbs.) limited to 150 gallons or less.
    Licensed Individual/Company Washing/detailing permitted anytime using low volume methods, voluntary reduction.
    NURSERIES
    Low Volume Irrigation/Hand Watering Permitted anytime, voluntary reduction.
    Overhead Irrigation (inside) Permitted daily, 8:00 a.m.—8:00 p.m. Permitted on odd numbered calendar days, 8:00 a.m.—8:00 p.m. Permitted on odd numbered calendar days, 8:00 a.m.—4:00 p.m.
    Overhead Irrigation (outside) Permitted daily, 7:00 p.m.—7:00 a.m. Permitted on odd numbered calendar days, 7:00 p.m.—7:00 a.m. Permitted on odd numbered calendar days, 12:01—7:00 a.m. Permitted on odd numbered calendar days, 2:00 a.m.—7:00 a.m.
    Moisture Stress Relief for Containerized Nursery (one gallon or less) Permitted daily, 10 minutes per irrigation zone: 11:30 a.m.—12:00 p.m. (noon); 1:30 p.m.—2:00 p.m.; 3:30 p.m.—4:00 p.m.
    Flood Irrigation Permitted 8 days per month. Permitted 6 days per month. Permitted 4 days per month. Permitted 2 days per month.
    LANDSCAPE WATERING                                                                Same schedule as residential landscape watering.
    AGRICULTURE
    Overhead Irrigation (including portable volume guns) Permitted daily 2:00 p.m.—10:00 a.m. Permitted daily 7:00 p.m.—7:00 a.m.
    Moisture Stress Relief (field-grown citrus nursery stock) Permitted daily, 10 minutes per irrigation zone: 11:30 a.m.—12:00 p.m. (noon) 1:30 p.m.—2:00 p.m. Permitted daily, 10 minutes per irrigation zone: 11:30 a.m.—12:00 p.m. (noon); 1:30 p.m.—2:00 p.m.; 3:30 p.m.—4:00 p.m.
    Soil Flooding Permitted for vegetable seed and rice planting, burning sugarcane before harvest, and harvesting of sod.
    GOLF COURSES
    Greens and Tees (only during non-daylight hours for all Phases) Permitted daily during non-daylight hours. GREENS: voluntarily reduced. TEES: front nine holes permitted Monday, Wednesday, Saturday; back nine holes permitted Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday. GREENS: voluntarily reduced. TEES: front nine holes permitted Saturday; back nine holes permitted Sunday.
    Front Nine Fairways, Roughs, Non-playing Areas 3 days Monday, Wednesday, Saturday 12:01 a.m.—8:00 a.m. 2 days Wednesday, Saturday 12:01 a.m.—8:00 a.m. 1 day Saturday 12:01 a.m.—7:00 a.m. 1 day Saturday 4:00 a.m.—7:00 a.m.
    Back Nine Fairways, Roughs, Non-playing Areas 3 days Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday 12:01 a.m.—8:00 a.m. 2 days Thursday, Sunday 12:01 a.m.—8:00 a.m. 1 day Sunday 12:01 a.m.—7:00 a.m. 1 day Sunday 4 a.m.—7:00 a.m.
    Newly Seeded, Sprigged Areas (planted for less than 30 days) Permitted daily, 10 minutes per Irrigation zone: 11:30 a.m.—12:00 p.m. (noon); 1:30—2:00 p.m.; 3:30—4:00 p.m. Permitted daily, 5 minutes per Irrigation zone: 11:30 a.m.—12:00 p.m. (noon); 1:30—2:00 p.m.; 3:30—4:00 p.m. PROHIBITED
    RECREATION AREAS (Watering new or existing landscaping permitted during residential landscape watering schedule.)
    Newly Seeded, Sprigged Areas (planted for less than 30 days) Permitted daily, 10 minutes per Irrigation zone: 11:30 a.m.—12:00 p.m. (noon); 1:30—2:00 p.m.; 3:30—4:00 p.m. Permitted daily, 5 minutes per Irrigation zone: 11:30 a.m.—12:00 p.m. (noon); 1:30—2:00 p.m.; 3:30—4:00 p.m. Less than 5 acres permitted Mon., Wed., Fri., 4:00—7:00 a.m. 5 acres or more permitted Mon., Wed., Fri., 12:01—7:00 a.m. Less than 5 acres permitted Saturday, 6:00—7:00 a.m. 5 acres or more permitted Saturday, 4:00—7:00 a.m.
    Recreation/Sporting Surfaces (porous, non-vegetated) Permitted daily, 10 minutes prior to each event using low volume watering.
    Pressure Cleaning (low volume, voluntary reduction) 7 days 5 days Monday through Friday 2 days Monday, Wednesday
    * For recreation areas, golf courses, nurseries, and other agricultural uses refer to the Water Shortage Rule.

    (Ord. No. 02-2001, § 2, 3-15-01)

  • Home

  • Codes

  • Ordinances

New Primary Water Atmospheric Water Cycle Poster and Interview

PWI_poster_rev7-29-18

PWI_Interview

The Primary Water Institute – www.primarywaterinstitute.org
INTERVIEW WITH PAL PAUER
I=Interviewer P=Pal Pauer
I: The following dialogue explains in detail the Primary and Secondary
Water Cycles Chart, the copyright illustration shown at the water-cycle tab
page on the website of primarywaterinstitute.org
Today we’re going to explain in detail the illustration you see before you,
which shows the primary and secondary water cycles. You’ll see that the
mantle of the earth contains H2O, that primary water is created deep within
the earth from the synthesis of hydrogen and oxygen under tremendous
The Primary Water Institute – www.primarywaterinstitute.org
pressure from the earth’s internal heat.
H20 in the form of vapor is forced up through the weakest areas of earth’s
crust, the rock fissures, and it becomes liquid as it cools. Primary water is
forced upward. Atmospheric secondary water driven by Solar Energy flows
downward.
I:
Let us examine the illustration starting from the left.
Our consultant today is Pal Pauer, founder of The Primary Water Institute.
Pal, the first black line says “Natural PW Spring.” PW stands for “primary
water,” the water’s coming up from deep within the earth, so it is primary
water, correct?
P: Yes, actually these springs are quite common throughout the world. On
the left drawing they’re on flat ground, but sometimes a primary water
spring manifests on top of a mountain co-mingling with run-off water
(drawing on right), sometimes in a valley, sometimes in the middle of a
desert, like the Sahara. These desert waters do not come from the sky, we
should be asking what an “oasis” is all about! The water is being forced up
from deep below
The Primary Water Institute – www.primarywaterinstitute.org
I: Tell us about the black line pointing to a yellow illustration.
P: This is a drilling rig that has been placed by someone trained to locate
primary water in the fracture, the faulted structure. The caption reads “PW—
which stands for Primary Water—Well at a depth of 200 to 800 feet” but the
fact is one could locate primary water at zero feet, or a thousand feet, the
depth is really unknown.
I: Going to the right, are a couple of rain clouds are obviously producing
water from the Hydrologic Cycle. Please tell us about the next 4 black lines.
The Primary Water Institute – www.primarywaterinstitute.org
P: The first line identifies Permeable surface, pointing to permeable ground,
which is comprised of unsorted material which could be crushed gravel,
sands, or soil which has been oxidized on surface from which we grow our
food. “Permeable” is simply any kind of oxidized surface into which water
from the secondary cycle, water or snow melt, can and does penetrate. It’s
part of the secondary cycle—water can evaporate from or permeate into it —
in short, it’s not concrete or solid rock.
I: Why is the underground stream coming from rain runoff from the
mountain labeled “Polluted Aquifer”?
P: “Polluted” does not imply malicious or unconscious intent. Any aquifer
The Primary Water Institute – www.primarywaterinstitute.org
that is trapped beneath this permeable material, which we occupy has to be
polluted because of our presence, and the presence of animals. We occupy
that space. So ANYTHING we throw away, flush, dispose of, will find its
way down to this aquifer. Today pollutants also come from man made
contaminants into the atmosphere, which also includes radioactivity from
nuclear problems.
I: Tell us about the Reservoir in the illustration.
P: A reservoir is part of the secondary water cycle, even if constructed at a
height higher than the structures with human occupancy, because a reservoir
receives its water from rain or runoff.
I: There is a huge push for chemicals to treat our drinking water from the
reservoirs. Water obtained directly from primary water would not need to be
treated to be safe to drink, is this true?
P: Absolutely.
I: The fourth line called runoff?
P: Runoff flows from the highest point to the lowest point in our
environment, and that water joins with the other waters of the secondary
water cycle.
I: Let’s look at the larger lower white oval entitled “Primary Water Cycle,”
please tell us about it.
The Primary Water Institute – www.primarywaterinstitute.org
P: We didn’t know exactly what to name the full process so we called it
primary water cycle. First of all, it refers to water that originates in the
Mantle, the water cycle which predates even the existence of an atmosphere.
The oceans were “made” and the secondary water cycle came about
thereafter from evaporation. We have evidence that the level of the ocean is
not the same as it was 5 to 10 thousand years ago; the water in the mantle
contributes to our “water planet” being the “water planet” that it is. The total
value of our ocean waters is in fact growing today.
I: Lets look back up to the secondary water cycle. Locate the sun. There is a
small lake to the right of the rain cloud on the left.
The Primary Water Institute – www.primarywaterinstitute.org
Underneath it we see an aquifer composed of both runoff water and primary
water. So some aquifers have both kinds of water?
P: Primary water comes up from the mantle and injects itself—the earth has
faults, fractures, so surface and primary water commingle in aquifers, in
some lakes and some places in the ocean. This is shown on the illustration in
the area directly below the sun.
I: So we have a situation of secondary water from the polluted cycle
commingling with primary water—an ongoing dilution of the pollution via
this comingling. In places primary water is constantly and continually
surfacing.
P: Correct. Except where the primary water fissure don’t surface. Let’s take
a look at those.
I: In this illustration we see in each of the two mountains which underneath
a large rainclouds that there are primary water fissures which do reach the
surface.
The Primary Water Institute – www.primarywaterinstitute.org
P: That is absolutely correct. You can see two drilling rigs,
showing that you can access those waters that are trying to surface. The dark
line shows the drill going into the primary water fissure. Today there are
drilling rigs, which allow us to access a fissure, access these waters that are
trying to surface, by drilling either vertically or horizontally. The yellow
drilling rig on the left show a drill, which is indicated by the black line,
entering horizontally, and the yellow rig on the right has a drill—again,
indicated the black line—drilling vertically into a separate fissure. How one
chooses to drill of course depends on the setting and the logistics, can you
drill horizontally, is there a place to put the rig? In the old days we didn’t
have rigs that would drill horizontally, we had to tool into the mountain, but
now there exist such rigs.
I: We are seeing fissures that have never surfaced. Is it “better” to allow it to
exit to reduce the force of pressure.
P: It makes no difference. This planet provides for us to use. It makes no
difference to the planet whether we use it or we don’t use it!
I: Moving right to the Volcanic Eruptions, can you tell us about that?
P: There are simply no volcanic eruptions known, anywhere, without water
vapors which is further proof of the fact that when the unsorted magma
surfaces in the form of a eruptions, of volcanoes, they bring along with them
a yet undistilled, unseparated water in the form of steam. The magma from
below brings along a great deal of water, in the form of steam. When it
The Primary Water Institute – www.primarywaterinstitute.org
doesn’t erupt, it can exist simply as hot springs, which also exist all over the
world.
I: Tell us about the Fault lines filled with Primary Water in the ground the
far right of the illustration. What should the viewer understand about these?
P: Fault lines also indicate sheer zones are a result of indirect activity down
below. There can be vertical or horizontal faults, all of which are a result of
the indirect activity from down below. The solid material down below is sort
of bouncing around. The direction of the fault depends on which way the
push comes—upwards, downwards, sideways. Earth movement can uncover
a primary water fissure—which is exactly what happened recently in Napa
Valley after the 6.0 earthquake—or it can disrupt and cut off a prior flow.
People have asked whether drilling for primary water in such fault lines, and
thereby releasing the pressure would reduce earthquakes? The answer is that
such drilling wouldn’t stop earth movements, because everything down
below is under stress. It might mitigate earth movement, so we could have a
2 instead of 7 rated earthquake.
I: Do we have enough potable water for our world?
P: In fact we have more water today than we’ve ever had in the history of
the planet. The point is that we don’t always have the water in the places we
would like to have it if we rely only on the secondary water cycle, which is
totally reliant on that which evaporates. The planet itself has enough potable
water within it, which could see us through these weather cycles, which we
have for many unknown reasons. We have a back up system, which is this
planet.
The Primary Water Institute – www.primarywaterinstitute.org
I: Seems as if we have been relying on wrong information about water
scarcity, about where water comes from, in a way analogous to think of our
knowledge as in a period similar to that of flat earth science.
P: I concur 100% percent.
I: Recently in California there have been emergency moratoriums on well
drilling. For example, in October 2014 the County of Ventura, Calif. put a
moratorium on all drilling which was reducing the ground water table and
resulting in ocean intrusion. Farmlands abutting the ocean are finding
increased salinity, such that the land can no longer be farmed because of
high salt content.
P: Ventura County should know better. The ancient river basin of Santa
Clara Valley River flows into the ocean at Oxnard and Pt. Magu. It is
made up of both secondary and primary water sources. They refer to the
water as “our bank account” but they don’t know where their money comes
from. It’s a distribution choice. In the past they’ve pumped too much water
from that basin and could not maintain the ability of the basin to sustain
itself and keep the salt water out. They could choose to accomplish
replenishing the water from the California aqueduct, which is to rob Peter to
pay Paul.
Or they could choose to have water wells in structures that Ventura County
is well noted for and drill for primary water in, say, the foothills of upper
Ojai.
It’s a question of distribution and of cost. Such wells are independent of the
atmosphere, and would be there even in the drought periods.
I: Pal, your Primary & Secondary Water Cycles chart is easy to understand.
We have simply not been taught. Thank you for your contribution to our
understanding.

WATER ALERT: Flood Protection and Groundwater Recharge Plan Now Available for Public Comment

Flood Protection and Groundwater Recharge Plan Now Available for Public Comment

Santa Rosa, CA  –  August 20, 2018  –  Members of the public are invited to submit comments on a storm water resources plan for the Petaluma River and Sonoma Creek watersheds that has identified more than 60 projects that will utilize storm water from heavy rainfall for beneficial uses, such as flood protection, recharge of groundwater, slowing erosion from hillsides, and improving water quality in creeks and streams.

The Southern Sonoma County Storm Water Resources Plan (SWRP) is funded through a grant received by the Sonoma County Water Agency (Sonoma Water) and is being developed collaboratively under the guidance of a Technical Advisory Committee made up of 13 agencies and non-profit organizations in both watersheds. Project ideas were submitted last year by the public or organizations and were reviewed by the Technical Advisory Committee and then prioritized within the SWRP. Projects included in the plan do not receive any funding, but are qualified to apply for state funding to implement the projects.

Public comments on the SWRP can be submitted to Susan Haydon, Project Specialist, susan.haydon@scwa.ca.gov, or by using an online form: https://goo.gl/forms/tZsXb7pBuRGwf6ZO2. The public comment period will close on September 17, 2018. To learn more about the SWRP visit www.scwa.ca.gov/SWRP.

Storm water is water generated by rainstorms that runs off surfaces such as rooftops, streets and parking lots into creeks and streams. Storm water projects capture this water by slowing it, storing it or allowing it to recharge groundwater. To be eligible in the plan, projects must provide multiple benefits, which could include flood control, groundwater recharge, water reuse, and improved water quality in waterways.

“We appreciate the hard work that the community and the local stakeholders have put into developing this plan,” said Sonoma Water Director Susan Gorin, who represents the Sonoma Valley as the First District Supervisor. “This is a wonderful opportunity for our communities to develop new ways of using runoff to protect our watersheds. Now the challenge is to get some of these projects funded.”

Sonoma Water Director David Rabbitt’s Second Supervisorial District includes the Petaluma River Watershed. “There is a lot of interest in our community to develop projects that help with flooding, groundwater recharge, and water quality,” he said. “Public participation is critical to this process. The more input we receive the stronger this plan will be and the better qualified the projects will be for funding.”

To learn more about the Southern Sonoma Storm Water Resources Plan, please visit www.sonomacountywater.org/SWRP/.

Sonoma Water logo with tagline